UN Security Council to discuss US recognition of Jerusalem


A Palestinian protester hurls stones towards Israeli troops during clashes at a protest against Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, near the West Bank city of Ramallah. (photo: Mohamad Torokman / Reuters)

Meeting to be held as Palestinian protests and global criticism grow over Trump recognising Jerusalem as Israeli capital.

By Peter Beaumont | The Guardian | Dec 7, 2017

Recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital puts the US out of step with the rest of the world, and legitimizes Israeli settlement-building in the east — considered illegal under international law.

The UN security council is expected to meet on Friday to discuss Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a decision against which condemnation continues to mount across the Middle East and internationally.

Eight countries on the 15-member council requested the meeting, including the UK, Italy and France, amid claims from Palestine and Turkey that Trump’s recognition is in breach of both international law and UN resolutions.

The EU foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, said the bloc had united position that Jerusalem must be the capital of both Israel and a future Palestinian state. The Russian foreign ministry said US recognition risked “dangerous and uncontrollable consequences.”

As Palestinians held protests in several cities across the West Bank, most key US allies in the Middle East also joined criticism of the move.

The Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, hailed Trump’s recognition as “historic” and claimed other countries were in contact about following the US’s lead, but was alone among regional leaders in praising the move.

Saudi Arabia’s royal court called it “unjustified and irresponsible” in a rare rebuke of the US, and the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, said Trump had thrown the Middle East into a “ring of fire.”

“Hey Trump! What do you want to do?” Erdoğan said as he left Ankara for a visit to Greece. “What kind of approach is this? Political leaders do not stir things up, they seek to make peace!”

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