Israel’s FBI gives human rights researcher a “warning”

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A B’Tselem photographer records in the city of Hebron, Jan. 28, 2019. (photo: Esty Dziubov / TPS)
Israel’s internal security service, Shin Bet, interrogated a field researcher for rights group B’Tselem who they said was always around during Palestinian activity.

By Amira Hass | Israel-Palestine News / reposted from Ha’aretz | Mar 15, 2021

His job is to document operations by official Israeli forces like the army, the Civil Administration and the police, as well as actions taken by settlers, against Palestinians.

A field researcher for Israeli human rights organization B’Tselem was investigated and warned by the Shin Bet Security service last week.

The security service coordinator, who identified himself as Captain Eid, told the researcher, Nasser Nawaj’ah, that he was “making trouble and threatening the army.” Captain Eid mentioned in this regard the incident involving Harun Abu Aram of the village al-Rakiz, who is lying paralyzed in hospital after a solider shot him in the neck because he tried to stop the army from seizing a neighbor’s generator.

Nawaj’ah is a resident of Sussia, in the southern West Bank. His job is to document operations by official Israeli forces like the army, the Civil Administration and the police, as well as actions taken by settlers, against Palestinians. He photographed, for example, the arrest of five boys from the village of Umm Lasafa by soldiers last Wednesday.

Nawaj’ah knew he was summoned to the Shin Bet when he was detained at a military checkpoint between the area of Sussia and the city of Yatta a week ago Saturday. He was on his way to visit his wife’s grandfather, who was hospitalized. After an hour-long detention, he was told to speak with the Shin Bet representative (using one of the soldiers’ phones), who told him that he could decide between being arrested immediately for the following day’s questioning, or to give his word and come himself.

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