The mainstreaming of Christian Zionism could warp foreign policy

The mainstreaming of Christian Zionism could warp foreign policy ...
Vice President Pence speaks at Christians United for Israel’s annual summit on July 8, 2019, in Washington. (photo: Patrick Semansky / AP)
How the history of dispensationalism shapes U.S. foreign policy today.

By Jeffrey Rosario | The Washington Post |  June 30, 2020

In a recent sermon, John Hagee, founder and chairman of CUFI, alleged that the coronavirus ‘was not an accident, it was planned.’

This week, Christians United for Israel (CUFI), the nation’s largest pro-Israel organization, will host a virtual summit in lieu of what was originally expected to be a major conference in Washington. Featured speakers include a lineup of top U.S. and Israeli officials: Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and Republican Sens. Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Tom Cotton.

In a recent sermon, John Hagee, founder and chairman of CUFI, alleged that the coronavirus “was not an accident, it was planned.” He claimed that liberal American politicians, the media and China have conspired to extend the pandemic into November to further disrupt the U.S. economy and undermine President Trump’s reelection campaign. CUFI has complained that the conspiracy behind the pandemic has distracted the U.S. government from its role in the Middle East.

And we can’t simply dismiss Hagee and his conspiratorial rhetoric, because CUFI represents a formidable constituency that lobbies politicians and other religious groups in support of Israel. Hagee claims to have influenced Trump’s transfer of the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and offered a prayer at its dedication, praised the assassination of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani and was present in the East Room of the White House when Trump discussed his Middle East peace plan.

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