Trump’s plan to move US embassy to Jerusalem angers Middle East Christians

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Christians in Amman, Jordan, protest President Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital on Dec 13, 2017. (photo: Muhammad Hamed / Reuters)

Religious leaders turned off Bethlehem’s Christmas tree lights to protest the White House announcement.

By Loveday Morris | The Washington Post | Dec 13, 2017


“When they talk about Christian minorities in danger, they talk about Iraq and other regions where ISIS is the threat. They never, ever address the issue of Palestinian Christians under Israeli occupation. . . . Our mere existence as Christians here is inconvenient as it means this conflict can’t be framed as a religious war between Jews and Muslims. It’s not about religion. It’s a political conflict over land and resources.”
— Rev. Mitri Raheb, a Lutheran pastor in Bethlehem


Some of the festive cheer was missing this weekend at a public Christmas tree lighting near the site where Christians believe an angel proclaimed Christ’s birth to local shepherds.

“Our oppressors have decided to deprive us from the joy of Christmas,” Patriarch Michel Sabbah, the former archbishop and Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, told the crowd in the town of Beit Sahour in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. “Mr. Trump told us clearly Jerusalem is not yours.”

The Trump administration’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and move the U.S. Embassy there has provoked widespread opposition among Christians across the Middle East. When Vice President Pence arrives next week on a trip touted as a chance to check on the region’s persecuted Christians, he will be facing an awkward backlash.

Continue reading “Trump’s plan to move US embassy to Jerusalem angers Middle East Christians”

TOMORROW: Is peace possible in the Holy Land?

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The Rev. Alex Awad in Bethlehem. (photo: Indiana Center for Middle East Peace)

Ten ways churches can contribute to peace in Israel and Palestine.

Please join our brothers and sisters at University Presbyterian Church for this exciting presentation by the Rev. Alex Awad.

Date: Wednesday, Nov 15, 2017
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Location: The Inn Chapel
University Presbyterian Church
4540 15th Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98105
Information: Event website
Tickets: Free

Event Details

The Rev. Alex Awad is a retired missionary who served under the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church Israel/Palestine. He is the former pastor of the East Jerusalem Bible Church and Professor at Bethlehem Bible College.

More information about Rev. Awad here →

EVENT: Is peace possible in the Holy Land?

awad
The Rev. Alex Awad in Bethlehem. (photo: Indiana Center for Middle East Peace)

Ten ways churches can contribute to peace in Israel and Palestine.

Please join our brothers and sisters at University Presbyterian Church for this exciting presentation by the Rev. Alex Awad.

Date: Wednesday, Nov 15, 2017
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Location: The Inn Chapel
University Presbyterian Church
4540 15th Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98105
Information: Event website
Tickets: Free

Event Details

The Rev. Alex Awad is a retired missionary who served under the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church Israel/Palestine. He is the former pastor of the East Jerusalem Bible Church and Professor at Bethlehem Bible College.

More information about Rev. Awad here →

Rick Steves Donates $50,000 to Palestinian Cultural Center

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(photo: ricksteves.com)

By Rick Steves / ricksteves.com
March 13, 2017


When I think about the “love thy neighbor” ethic and Golden Rule that is a common denominator of the three great religions that share the region we call the Holy Land, and then hear the leader of my country declare “America first,” I’m troubled by the disconnect.


Over the past weeks, millions of Americans have been inspired, in their own way, to celebrate and defend what they believe makes our country so . . . American. Last Wednesday, I declared that I’d give a donation to an organization helping the youth of Palestine equal to the amount spent on travel gear through last Thursday at ricksteves.com/shop.

More than 600 of you responded, spending a total of $33,287 on our Rick Steves guidebooks, DVDs, accessories, and travel bags. That’s triple our normal total!

As promised, I’m matching your collective shopping spree. And — further motivated by our government’s threat to drastically cut domestic and foreign aid programs — I’m upping my gift to an even $50,000. Thinking about how this money will help that community in such a troubled region brings me (and hopefully all of us) real joy.

Continue reading “Rick Steves Donates $50,000 to Palestinian Cultural Center”